Tag Archives: social networking

Don’t Let the Roar of the So-Called Social Media Expert Misdirect Your Business

By Jason Menard

Why is it that so many so-called social media experts promote their craft with all the subtlety of a carnival barker? It’s true, the squeaky wheel gets the grease – but in the case of social networking, that grease is often little more than snake oil.

I’ve been heavily involved with social networking as part of my job for a few years now. I love it, I think I’m good at it, and I strongly believe in its potential for both business and personal applications. Continue reading

Fringe Candidates Foolishly Have No Door Upon Which Opportunity Can Knock

By Jason Menard

For a sub-species of people that make their living, in part, by going from door to door, it shocks me that certain politicians – including those who would benefit the most – are neglecting an opportunity that’s knocking louder than ever.

In fact, not only are they not hearing the knock – they haven’t even bothered to put up a door whatsoever. Continue reading

Professional or Puerile? How Do We Want to Be Represented?

By Jason Menard

Politics has long been a game of dirty pool. With only 30 days to go before Ontarians head to the polls, we can only hope that voters will decide they want a straight shooter — and that politicians will remember that when we go to the polls, we’re electing someone who will represent us.

And that means candidates must act in a way worthy of our voice. I know how I would represent myself in the legislature — so I expect my elected voice to behave in a similar fashion. Continue reading

Mob Behaviour, Online and Off, Vancouver’s Legacy

By Jason Menard,

Vancouver’s legacy won’t be one of shattered glass and the residual stench of long-died-out flames; instead, the post-Stanley Cup riots will be a defining event in using social media to combat mob behaviour.

Unfortunately, what’s started as a good story of an on-line community rallying around its city to bring a group of cowards to justice is rapidly becoming a cautionary tale about the lure of anonymity both online and off.  Continue reading