Tag Archives: media

Lamentations Don’t Pay the Bills – You Get What You’re Willing to Pay For

By Jay Menard,

With yesterday’s announcement of the Postmedia/Torstar swap of 41 newspapers, with the intent of shutting them down, the online world was above with lamentations about the loss of community content, the unfairness of the decision, and allegations of big business and corporate greed ruling the roost.

The thing is, Instead of wringing our collective hands after the fact, maybe we should be more willing to reach into our collective wallets beforehand.

Or, in short, if you want good, community content, pay for it. Continue reading

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Boston Coverage — Not the Death of Media, but the End of ‘First’ Era

By Jason Menard

Like so many times before, the death of mainstream media has been greatly exaggerated. But if anything has died as a result of the questionable coverage of the Boston terrorist bombings and subsequent manhunt, hopefully it’s the prevalence of jumping the gun when reporting potential smoking guns.

And that’s something for which both traditional and social media are guilty. Continue reading

Social Media’s Growing Up by Learning its Lessons from Traditional Sources

By Jason Menard

Sure, there may still be some growing pains here and there, but there are signs that social media is growing up and it’s putting the responsibility for content back where it belongs – the reader — thanks to lessons learned from traditional sources.

Two recent examples have illustrated this perfectly. I discussed the Tori Stafford murder trial coverage, and the tribulations it caused amongst a media struggling to figure out how to balance the public’s right to know with its equal right to not know. In the end, especially on Twitter, local media chose to post key messages on their main feeds, directing them to full content on a parallel Twitter channel – with full disclaimers and warnings of the graphic content. Continue reading

More Info than Ever, but Who Can You Trust?

By Jason Menard

The number of TV stations, Web sites, publications, and social networking sites, can not just sate those who have a thirst for politics – it can overwhelm them. So the question now becomes, how do you filter this firehose-like deluge of information and make the best choice for you?

The Ontario provincial election is less than a month away and while it may seem that we’ve been inundated with campaign rhetoric and information, the fact is that the writ was just dropped and the campaign only officially began yesterday.  Continue reading

California Gaming Law Puts Rules Squarely in Parents’ Hands

By Jason Menard

Free speech comes with a cost – personal responsibility. The repeal of a California law banning the sale and rental of violent games to minors puts the responsibility for parenting right where it should lie – with the parents.

Unfortunately for many kids that’s not exactly a comforting thought.  Continue reading

Keep Your Biases Where I Can See ‘em – Or Step Out of the Kitchen

By Jason Menard

I like to keep the wackos where I can see them.

Call me strange, but I’ve always preferred to have racists and bigots, misogynists and misandrists, crackpots and whack jobs out in public. I’m not afraid of the guy who posts pro-NAZI propaganda on his Web site. Him I can avoid and at least I know where he stands. What scares me more are the people who keep their biases to themselves – they’re the ones that are the most dangerous because you never see them coming. Continue reading

Stafford Case Prompts Question of Right Versus Need to Know

By Jason Menard

Should there ever be a point when protecting the public’s need to know gets tempered by what the public truly needs to know?

Today the Supreme Court of Canada upheld an earlier decision to partially lift a publication ban in the Tori Stafford murder case. As a result, we’ve learned that Terri-Lynne McClintic pleaded guilty in April to first-degree murder charges that will see her serve 25-to-life in prison. Continue reading