Tag Archives: elections

Professional or Puerile? How Do We Want to Be Represented?

By Jason Menard

Politics has long been a game of dirty pool. With only 30 days to go before Ontarians head to the polls, we can only hope that voters will decide they want a straight shooter — and that politicians will remember that when we go to the polls, we’re electing someone who will represent us.

And that means candidates must act in a way worthy of our voice. I know how I would represent myself in the legislature — so I expect my elected voice to behave in a similar fashion. Continue reading

A Channel’s Manic Monday

By Jason Menard

What are you doing Monday night? Hopefully you’ll have already been to the polls to cast a well-informed vote. So perhaps you’d like to spend a few moments during the evening of May 2nd to check out how the election is progressing?

May I invite you to tune into London’s A-Channel. I’ve been invited by local writer and tech guru extraordinaire Carmi Levy to participate in an exciting venture in support of the local station’s coverage. Continue reading

Pair Vote, Vote Mob Misguided Solutions to a Bigger Problem

By Jason Menard

Two political events designed to stop a Conservative majority are noble in intent, but are simply two wastes of valuable time and votes, which really only work in an ideal world. Instead, these actions actually have the potential to do more damage to the Canadian election process and represent short-sighted solutions to much deeper problems.

Pair Vote represents everything that’s wrong with federal politics. First, it claims that its intent is “to prevent a false majority by the Conservatives.” The Conservatives have not had a majority, false or otherwise, since they’ve been in power. They have a plurality – there’s a big difference. Continue reading

Reigniting the Passion Behind Canada’s Cooling Election Fever

By Jason Menard,

Instead of burning with passion as a result of election fever, I find myself on the precipice of succumbing to burning out with the process — like many of my fellow Canadians apparently already have. However, one only need to look beyond our borders to find the spark that should reignite that fire.

As we enter our fourth election since 2004, I have found myself wondering if remaining passionate about the process is a waste of time. It’s not that I don’t have faith that Canadians will do the right thing – I just don’t have faith that Canadians will do anything. Continue reading

Left-Leaners Must Decide Whether to Vote with Head or Heart

By Jason Menard, 

If you’re a left-leaning voter in this Canadian federal election, you’re faced with more than the obvious four options when you step up to the ballot box — you’ve also got to deal with an even harder question: to vote with your head or with your heart.

Oh to be a conservative voter. It would be so much easier, since you really and truly only have one choice. But for those of us who find ourselves on the left-hand side of the political spectrum, in addition to the Liberal/NDP/Green debate, you also have to whether you’re willing to engage in strategic voting. Continue reading

A Feather in Canada’s (Internet) Cap for the Future

By Jason Menard

On-line public pressure may not only serve to pull the plug on a move to cap Internet usage in the Great White North; it may, in addition to serving as a cyber-feather in our collective caps for democracy, show how we can get people involved in the political process in the future.

Lazy, apathetic, disinterested voters have been both the bane and the boon of politicians for years – a bane to those interested in making change; a boon to those who are content with pushing their agendas through parliament before the masses catch on – but a recent kerfuffle in Canada has shown that there’s something that can be the great equalizer.

The Internet. Continue reading

Best Way to Help Your Community? Don’t Vote

By Jason Menard

What I’m about to say may seem sacrilegious to some of you, but here it is. Don’t vote.

Before you think I’ve totally lost it, hear me out. The above is not a blanket statement. Yes, I think that everyone should vote, but not everyone should vote. Continue reading