Tag Archives: Twitter

Voices Carry

By Jay Menard

The problem is not the existence of echo chambers. They’re a fact of life. The only problem comes from not realizing you’re in one and not searching out other voices.

The other night, I was ‘involved’ in a conversation that occurred without my knowledge. It was a Twitter discussion about whether London’s downtown was over-represented on the social network. As I’ve discussed the need to seek out different voices, my name came up.

To be honest, I think over-representation is the wrong word. It’s just the simple fact of life that certain types of people flock to certain locations. It’s neither good nor bad, it just is.

The only danger is when we believe our limited experience represents the totality of thought. And that’s why, from a communications perspective, seeking out differing voices to ensure we’re getting the whole story is just common sense. Social is just one tool in a broad and diverse community-growing and communication-fostering tool box. Continue reading

London Council Exists in Our Own Image

By Jay Menard

I admire London’s new mayor for reaching out to the community, but I’m concerned that asking the London Twitterverse about decorum is like polling cannibals about the benefits of a vegan lifestyle – they may be aware of the concept, but they certainly don’t practice it.

So it’s safe to say that any advice digested from that source be taken with a Goderich-sized grain of salt. After all, our existing council offers a pretty fair representation of London’s on-line community. Continue reading

A 3D Approach to Ensure You Are Always ‘Right’

By Jason Menard

What’s the best way to make sure you’re always ‘right’? For many, it’s using a 3D approach to on-line interaction. Unfortunately, using this approach causes you to miss out on a few other Ds — such as debate and discussion that can lead to positive development of ideas.

So what are these three Ds? You’ve likely seen them or experienced them anywhere there’s an on-line discussion, whether it be Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, or even newspaper comments sections. They are, in order:

Deride
Deflect
Dismiss

And here’s how they work. Continue reading

Signs My Online Presence Has Been Hijacked

By Jason Menard,

It’s the great social media cop-out: when one posts something mind-bogglingly stupid/racist/sexist/homophobic, the traditional blame is placed on ‘being hacked.’ You never know when it’s going to happen to you, but it’s better to be safe than sorry.

So, dear readers, my list of things, if you hear me say or do on-line, means that someone’s hijacked my Twitter feed or Facebook account, or has forced me posting against my will. Continue reading

For Me Mentality Misinterprets the Political Forum

By Jason Menard

For me.

These two words are what have been holding me back from making any sort of comment, posting any sort of reply, or engaging in any sort of debate.

For me.

As in, why bother trying to be rational because the Twitter debate is exclusively centred around, “For me.” Continue reading

I’m in a Trut

I’m in a Trut.

Consider this my linguistic contribution to the Twitterverse. Basically, it’s a rut on Twitter. I’ve posted fewer Tweets and blogged even less often.

And the overriding symptom of a Trut is a severe case of the ‘Why Bothers?’ Continue reading

My Apology to the City of London — It’s Time to Grow Up

By Jay Menard

Name-calling, questioning people’s intellectual capabilities, mocking, snide supercilious comments, mean-spirited personal attacks? It’s somewhat sad that the very behaviour that we discourage amongst our children has become the culture of choice for on-line discourse in London, ON.

I learned very early on that you don’t have to like someone and you don’t have to agree with them. But you have to be respectful of everyone and their perspective. And, most importantly, you have to value their efforts and ideas.

Sadly, it’s a lesson lost on many of those who purport to work for a better London, Ontario. Continue reading