Tag Archives: children

Teachers’ Union Must Remember Our Children Aren’t Bargaining Chips

By Jason Menard

My daughter is not a bargaining chip.

I admire teachers. I think they have one of the toughest, most-thankless jobs in the world. I think that most of them are good people, trying to do their best while their hands are tied in red tape.

I also know that if teachers decide to withhold extracurricular services to students as part of their protest of Tuesday’s provincial legislative manoeuvers, then they’ll lose any and all sympathy and support that they might have received from me — and, likely, from many other parents just like me.

This is your fight, not my daughter’s. Continue reading

One Type of Homicide Not Justifiable; But it’s Certainly Understandable

By Jason Menard

Like Michael once said to Paul, “I’m a lover, not a fighter.”

I don’t believe in violence as a solution to conflict.

I don’t believe in guns as I firmly believe that they have no other purpose than to kill. Continue reading

Tori Stafford Will Not Be Forgotten As We All Owe Her a Debt of Gratitude

By Jason Menard

While I’ve found I have no interest in reading about the details behind the ultimate price Tori Stafford paid, I do realize that I owe her a tremendous debt of gratitude.

Today marked the start of the Tori Stafford murder trial. The Crown began delivering its opening statements – and you could follow along for up-to-the-minute coverage in any number of ways. Local radio, television, and newspapers have dispatched reporters to the scene. Continue reading

California Gaming Law Puts Rules Squarely in Parents’ Hands

By Jason Menard

Free speech comes with a cost – personal responsibility. The repeal of a California law banning the sale and rental of violent games to minors puts the responsibility for parenting right where it should lie – with the parents.

Unfortunately for many kids that’s not exactly a comforting thought.  Continue reading

Child Molesting Repeat Offender Renews Call for a Karla’s Law

By Jason Menard

Every once in a while a story comes around that challenges your beliefs; in my case, they generally revolve around children. And while I’d like to think I’m a progressive-thinking young(ish) man who is tolerant of those around him, I have to say a recent story got my blood boiling.

I don’t believe in capital punishment; I don’t believe that guns have any purpose but to kill (and I don’t buy that bullshit line about how guns don’t kill people, people kill people); and I do believe that people can be rehabilitated. I’m not a violent guy, by nature. Continue reading

Halloween Should Be Child’s Play

By Jason Menard

Apparently, without knowing it, I dressed up last night for Hallowe’en. My costume? A curmudgeon.

It didn’t start out that way. In fact, I inadvertently dressed up as something else Sunday evening – a popsicle. And apparently the cold had an impact on the trick or treaters, or lack thereof, on the evening.

As we were accompanying our eight-year-old daughter through the streets on her mad candy grab (she was determined to hit as many houses as possible), we noticed a marked lack of younger children on the streets. Only a handful of babies, a few toddlers, fewer still children my daughter’s age, and a smattering of pre-teens braved the sub-freezing temperatures.

But there was one group that seemed to be out in full force – the teenagers. Continue reading

School’s Out Forever

By Jason Menard

If I had to change career course mid-stream, you know what I wouldn’t want to be? A teacher.

Well, to be honest, I’m thinking being a postcard salesman would be number-one on my list – really, does anyone send postcards anymore? Even if you’re on vacation most people simply send an e-mail with digital photos that they’ve taken themselves – beats the bejeezus out of those cheesy “Wish You Were Here” photos.

But besides that and a few other jobs involving sewage treatment and other similar tasks, I think being a teacher would tax my sensibilities. That said, I already have a solid grasp of one of the fundamental philosophies of modern teaching techniques.

The lowest common denominator. Continue reading